14/06/2024 - 24/00049 - Adult Social Care Charging Policy - Higher Level Disability Benefits

Proposed decision

That the Cabinet Member for Adult Social Care and Public Health:

a) APPROVE the changes to the Adult Social Care Charging Policy; and

b) DELEGATE authority to the Corporate Director Adult Social Care and Health to revise the Adult Social Care Charging Policy and to take relevant actions, including keeping the policy updated as necessary, to implement the decision

 

Reason for the decision

 

In line with the approved Budget Book, Kent County Council (KCC) is proposing to change its policy for charging for adult social care provided in a person’s own home or in the community. This means we are reviewing how much some people may have to pay towards the chargeable services that KCC provides or arranges, which include:

·       Care and support provided at home (for example homecare including supported living); and

·       Care and support provided in the community (for example daytime support).

 

This policy does not impact on people who live in and receive care and support in a residential care home.

 

We are proposing to stop disregarding the higher or enhanced rates of Attendance Allowance (AA), Personal Independent Payment (PIP) and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) when we calculate a person’s income (we already take into account the lower, middle or standard rates of these benefits).

 

This would mean that individuals in receipt of care who receive higher rate of these benefits would have more income taken into account in their financial assessment which would mean that they are likely to pay more for their care and support than they do currently.

 

We need to look at the amount of income we can generate by people contributing towards the cost of their own care. This is why we are proposing a change to the charging policy.

 

Background

 

KCC provide adult social care services to approximately 16,394 residents aged over 18 years old (data taken January 2024). Approximately 15,806 of these people receive chargeable social care services, this includes providing services like residential care and support and care in a person’s own home or in the community.

 

When people living in Kent need adult social care, as well as assessing their care needs, we also assess their income to decide how much they pay towards their care. This is known as means testing. Some people don’t pay anything, and the council picks up all of the cost, some people pay a contribution, and some people pay for all of their care (these people are known as full payers).

 

KCC sets out what and how people need to pay in the Adult Social Care Charging Policy.

 

KCC has already made substantial improvements and efficiencies to the way social care is delivered in Kent, alongside trying to limit the impact on the people that draw on care and support and help make the service sustainable.

 

Whilst KCC continues to strive to provide the best services we can, we continue to have the following growing pressures:

 

·       Significantly less government funding compared to nine years ago and we are expected to fund services through council tax contributions and income from other sources such as charging. The Revenue Support Grant (which includes adult social care as well as other council services) has reduced from £246.7m in 2013-14 (the first year of current funding arrangements) to £11.8m in 2024-25. There have been a number of separate social care grants which have been provided progressively since 2016-17 (not exclusively adult social care) which amount to £192.9m in 2024-25 but these grants have been provided in recognition of the pressures in social care and to fund improvements rather than replace the Revenue Support Grant reductions.

 

·       Increasing demand (an additional 1,152 people from March 2022-March 2023) for adult social care services, including people having complex care and support needs.

 

·       Significant annual increases in the National Minimum Wage (NMW) since 1999, which have impacted on the fees charged by care and other providers.

 

·       Continuing impact of inflation, which means we face growing pressures in the care market, including workforce challenges and rising costs for delivering care packages.

 

Options (other options considered but not taken forward)

 

Before deciding on the preferred proposal presented in the consultation, a number of options were considered:

Alternative option considered

Why the option has not been taken forward to consultation

Only apply the proposed change to people new to receiving care and support from KCC’s adult social care service from the date the new policy is implemented. This would mean that existing people receiving adult social care services would not have the higher or enhanced rates of disability benefits considered when KCC calculates a person’s income.

Whilst this would reduce the number of people impacted by the proposed change it would not be fair and equitable for all people who draw on care and support and does not reduce the current funding gap.

Introduce the policy in stages, no more than a £12 increase to anyone’s charge per year, for existing people who draw on care and support to give them time to adjust.

Whilst this would reduce the impact of the proposed change it does not reduce the current budget gap as quickly. This would also be quite challenging to administrate both manually and on the case management system.

An increase to the level of Disability Related Expenditure (DRE) for everyone from £17.00.

This would reduce the funding available for adult social care and increase the budget gap further and would be applied to all rather than just those who receive the higher and enhanced benefits.

Increase Minimum Income Guarantee for basic living expenses such as utility bills and food.

This would reduce the funding available for adult social care and increase the budget gap further.

Automatically review DRE for all individuals who could potentially be impacted.

This would have an incredibly significant impact on operational resources and would redirect resources away from frontline services.

Offer DRE assessments for all 3,784 individuals directly impacted.

This would reduce the funding available for adult social care and have a significant impact on operational resources.

Do nothing.

Due to the significant financial challenge being faced by KCC, if we do not raise additional income from this proposed change, then other options would need to be considered.

 

Our preferred proposal would reduce the funding gap for adult social care services in Kent in year. However, we recognise that these alternative options could help to lessen the impact on individuals.

 

How the proposed decision supports Framing Kent's Future - our council strategy 2022 to 2026

The proposed decision aligns with the ambitions set out in Framing Kent’s Future to place Kent on a sustainable footing for the medium and long term and also aligns with Objective 2 of Securing Kent’s Future to identify opportunities to set a sustainable budget and MTFP.

 

Financial Implications

 

The latest budget monitoring presented to Cabinet on 21 March 2024 shows £30m budget gap for 2023-24, of which £31.3m relates to the Adult Social Care and Health Directorate before management action and one-off use of reserves are considered. Members have agreed the immediate actions needed to reduce spending in the short term and have set the course for getting the council back to financial sustainability, securing the services that residents in Kent need the most.

 

Spending growth in KCC 2024-25 is £209.6m as stated in the 2024-25 budget. The net change to the budget is £113.9m (matched by funding increases through government grants, council tax, etc), leaving £95.7m savings which need to be found.

 

Of the above, the spending growth in Adult’s 2024-25 is £115.8m as stated in the 2024-25 budget. The net change to the budget is £61.7m (matched by funding increases through government grants, council tax, etc), leaving £54.1m in savings/additional income which needs to be found, of which this proposal is included within.

 

It has been estimated that the proposed change could raise approximately £3.5million. We would use this money to help reduce the funding gap so that we can continue to provide council services to those who need them. If this proposal is not implemented, then the income would need to be achieved elsewhere.

 

Equalities implications

 

An initial Equality Impact Assessment (EqIA) has been completed and can be found on the consultation webpage: www.kent.gov.uk/adultsocialcarecharging or upon request. This is a live document and will continue to be reviewed and updated following the consultation.

 

Age, disability, sex, race and carer’s responsibilities have been identified as having potential for negative impact if we were to implement the proposed change.

 

We have taken the following information from two sets of data, these are:

·     Young people drawing on care and support aged from 18 to 25, who are moving from children’s social care into adults’ social care.

·     Adults aged 18 and over drawing on care and support from adult social care.

 

In the data for young people, there are 612 active individuals who receive care at home, in the community or have a direct payment that may be affected.

 

In the data for adults, there are potentially 9,011 individuals who receive care at home and in the community that may be affected.

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Adult Social Care and Public Health

Decision due date: Not before 06/06/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Division affected: (All Division);

Lead officer: Cathi Sacco

Notice of decision: 08/05/2024

Anticipated restriction: Open


13/06/2024 - 24/00024 - Expansion of Leigh Academy, Green Street Green Rd, Dartford DA1 1RB

Proposed decision:

 

The Cabinet Member for Education and Skills to:

 

  1. APPROVE the expansion of Leigh Academy by 2FE,

 

  1. AGREE to allocate £425,000, subject to a binding funding agreement, from the CYPE Capital Budget to the Leigh Academy Trust (LAT), to:
    1. enable design work for the essential internal and external works
    2. enable LAT to undertake essential internal modification works, during 2024.

 

  1. AGREE to allocate £975,000 from the CYPE Capital Budget, to enable KCC to undertake feasibility checks, design, plan, cost and tender for the project to construct a new standalone block, from June 2024

 

  1. DELEGATE authority to the Director of Infrastructure to, in consultation with the Director of Education, enter into any necessary contracts or other legal agreements, as required to implement this decision; and

 

  1. AGREE for the Director of Infrastructure to be the nominated Authority Representative within the relevant agreements, with authority to enter variations as envisaged under the contracts.

 

 

 

Reason for the decision

 

This proposal to expand Leigh Academy has been developed because the Kent Commissioning Plan 2024/28 indicates that there will be a shortfall in year 7 places in the Dartford and Swanley non-selective planning group.

 

To support KCC to mitigate against this shortfall, Leigh Academy agreed to increase its PAN from 240 to offer 270 places for September 2023, September 2024 and September 2025.

 

Following further discussions, Leigh Academy agreed to offer 300 places from 2026, subject to a physical expansion. This proposal seeks to facilitate the expansion by building a standalone block, and to enable various internal and external works.  The Trust, senior leadership team and governors of Leigh Academy agreed to consult on this proposal to permanently expand the school and enlarge the secondary provision within the school by the addition of 60 places per school year.

 

Leigh Academy, part of the Leigh Academy Trust (LAT), is a co-ed secondary school.  Following an inspection that took place in April 2023, Ofsted deems Leigh Academy to be a ‘GOOD’ school.

 

 

A decision is required now to allow internal modifications to Leigh existing building to be undertaken, which will allow the school to continue to admit an increased cohort from September 2024 and to begin work on external areas of the site.  The funding will also allow KCC to enter into a contract to undertake the requisite feasibility studies and design work for the main scheme to produce a new standalone block on site.  A separate decision will be taken by the Cabinet Member in due course to agree the overall funding of the scheme.  The estimated costs are explained below.

 

If no further action is taken in the longer term, Kent County Council will find it extremely difficult to provide sufficient secondary school places in the Dartford and Swanley non-selective planning group.

 

Background

 

Dartford Borough’s population is increasing with more families moving into the area and as a result, Kent County Council needs to add additional secondary school places to manage the increase in demand. One strategy for providing additional school places is to expand existing successful and popular schools.

 

The 2FE expansion is to be facilitated by internal alterations to the existing main school building, along with construction of a new teaching block at the front of the site to provide the level of accommodation required in accordance with BB103.  The existing tennis courts will be relocated to facilitate the construction of the new standalone block.  These internal and external works will be undertaken by LAT and the funding for the works will be passported to LAT from the CYPE Capital Budget, subject to a binding funding agreement being signed.  KCC will directly deliver the standalone block and related Highways mitigations, should they be required.

 

In order to accommodate the ongoing 2FE expansion, Leigh Academy have committed to an increased PAN in September 2024 (in line with September 2023), however this increased PAN requires an initial phase of internal alteration works to be undertaken to facilitate an increase in pupil numbers.

 

Any works undertaken by the Academy are to be overseen by the appointed KCC Consultant team.

 

Securing Kent’s Future

 

The 'Securing Kent's Future' strategy outlines the measures that KCC intend to take to ensure that Kent remains financially stable, now and long into the future.  It describes the statutory priorities, one of which being the statutory duty to ensure sufficient school places are available to any child or young person who requires one.  This duty applies to Special Educational Needs (SEN) provision, as well as mainstream settings.

 

This proposal is necessary for KCC to continue to deliver the statutory duty, in a cost-effective way, in line with the guidelines described in the Securing Kent's Future strategy. It will help to maintain KCC’s strategic role in supporting schools in Kent to deliver accessible, high quality education provision for all families.

 

The County Council’s Commissioning Plan for Education Provision in Kent 2024-28 is a five-year rolling plan which is updated annually.  It sets out KCC’s future plans as Strategic Commissioner of Education Provision across all types and phases of education in Kent. A copy of the latest plan can be viewed from this link:

 

https://www.kent.gov.uk/education-and-children/schools/education-provision/education-provision-plan

 

 

Financial Implications

 

Capital

 

The total cost of the expansion is estimated to be £10.5m, including both KCC and LAT spend which is to be allocated from the CYPE Capital Budget.   This sum has been included within the Basic Need Capital Programme that was recently agreed by Council. KCC will investigate whether other funding sources can be accessed, such as Community Infrastructure Levy, once full costs are known.

 

An allowance of up to £2,500 may be payable to the school, to outfit each new teaching room with appropriate ICT equipment, such as touch screens or projection equipment.  This will be met from the overall Capital allocation for this project.

 

Should the scheme not proceed through to completion, any costs incurred at the time of cessation would become abortive costs and are likely to be recharged to Revenue. This would be reported through the regular financial monitoring reports to Cabinet.

 

Revenue

 

The school would also receive funding for the additional pupils that it admits in line with the funding allocated to schools through KCC’s Schools Funding Formula.

 

As the scheme progresses, £6,000 per newly created learning space, would be provided towards the cost of furniture and equipment, such as tables, desks, chairs, cabinets and learning resources.

 

Both of these revenue allocations will be met from the Growth Funding provision held within the dedicated school's grant.

 

Human

 

The school will appoint additional staff as required; utilising revenue funding allocated through the Schools Funding Formula for these additional pupils.

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Education and Skills

Decision due date: Not before 22/05/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Lead officer: Ian Watts

Notice of decision: 23/04/2024

Anticipated restriction: Open


12/06/2024 - 24/00054 - Revenue and Capital Budget Monitoring Report – Outturn 2023-24

Proposed decision

 

Cabinet is asked to:

 

a)    note the capital and revenue outturn position for 2023-24; and

b)    agree that £2.097m is rolled forward to fund existing criteria (as per Appendix 1); and

c)    agree that £0.675m is rolled forward to fund Member grants (as per Appendix 1); and

d)    agree the drawing down of £12.372m from Smoothing reserves to fund in the 2023-24 overspend; and

e)    agree the £198.2m of capital slippage/re-phasing from 2023-24 will be added to the 2024-25 and later years capital budgets (as per Section 11 and Appendix 2); and

f)     note the review of the capital programme; and

g)    agree the proposed capital cash limit changes totalling £86.180m (as per Appendix 3); and

h)    agree the changes made as a result of the Reserves Review (as per Appendix 4)

 

 

Reason for the decision

 

The outturn position for the Council needs to be noted by Cabinet.  The rolling forward of funds into 2024-25, the capital budget changes and the reserves drawdowns and realignments need to be agreed by Cabinet.

 

Background – Provide brief additional context

 

The report on the Council’s financial position as at the end of 2023-24 will be reported to Cabinet on 20 June 2024, which shows an overspend on the revenue budget of £12.4m.  The report provides detail of our revenue and capital outturn positions and how the revenue overspend is funded from reserves, which needs to be agreed by Cabinet.

 

Cabinet is also asked to agree revenue budget roll forwards, capital re-phasing, capital programme cash limit changes and reserves realignment.

 

How the proposed decision supports the Framing Kent's Future - Our Council Strategy 2022-2026

 

Framing Kent’s Future (FKF), the KCC Strategic Statement, was approved at County Council in May 2022 and sets out the council’s ambition and strategic priorities until 2026. FKF acknowledged the significant financial and demand pressures the council would be facing over the coming four years, whilst concurrently delivering an ambitious agenda for Kent residents, businesses, and local communities. The Securing Kent's Future plans and this related Finance Monitoring report 2023-24 reflects the need to confirm a re-prioritisation of Council business within the framework of Framing Kent's Future - further details are set out within the “Securing Kent's Future” Cabinet report.

 

How the proposed decision supports Securing Kent’s Future

 

Securing Kent’s Future (SKF) acknowledges that given the significance of adults and children’s social care within the council’s budget, and that spending growth pressures on the council’s budget overwhelming (but not exclusively) come from social care, that the priority of delivering New Models of Care and Support must take precedence over the other priorities in Framing Kent’s Future.  This creates an expectation that council services across all directorates must collectively prioritise delivering the new models of care and support objective as a collective enterprise.

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: Not before 20/06/2024 This decision will be taken via the semi-urgent decision process

Lead officer: Cath Head

Notice of decision: 12/06/2024

Reason for urgency:
This decision will be taken via the semi-urgent decision process


11/06/2024 - 24/00052 - Approval to reprocure contractual arrangements for the operation, management and haulage services at household waste recycling centres (HWRCs) and co-located waste transfer stations (WTS) in Mid, East and West Kent (SC18031 and SC18031WK).

Proposed decision

 

(i) REPROCURE contracts for the operation of 17 HWRCs and co-located WTS;

 

And subsequently,

 

(ii)       DELEGATE authority to the Director for Environment and Circular Economy, to take relevant actions to facilitate the required procurement activity; and

 

(iii)      DELEGATE authority to the Director for Environment and Circular Economy in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Environment, to take relevant actions, including but not limited to, awarding, finalising the terms of and entering into the relevant contracts or other legal agreements, as necessary, to implement the decision.

 

Reason for the decision

 

The option to reprocure the service is recommended by the Cabinet Member for Environment as this option will enable KCC to drive savings through economies of scale and be assured that it is paying the current market price for the service.

 

Background

 

As the Waste Disposal Authority, KCC has a statutory responsibility to arrange for the disposal of the controlled waste collected in its area by the waste collection authorities, and to provide places at which persons resident in its area may deposit their household waste and for the disposal of waste so deposited.

Contracts with FCC Environment Ltd and Commercial Services Kent for the operation, management and haulage services Household Waste Recycling Centres and co-located Waste Transfer Stations are due to expire on 31 October 2025.

 

Other Options considered but discarded

 

Option 1 - Do nothing. Discounted due to failure to meet statutory duties.

Option 2 – Extend with FCC and CSKL for 5 years, as per the current contractual terms. Discounted as this option is unable to demonstrate best value and does not test the market for potential economies of scale.

Option 3 – Extend with FCC and CSKL for 7 years. Discounted due to legal and procurement risk.

Option 4 - CSKL to operate all sites.  Discounted due to technical and operational risk and unable to demonstrate best value.

Option 5 - FCC to operate all sites. Discounted due to legal risk.

 

The commission of this contract will meet KCC’s Framing Kent’s Future 2022-2026:

Priority 3 – Environmental Step Change -Continue to work with our commissioning partners to create the infrastructure and jobs that enable us to reprocess waste materials and produce energy within the county, in order to maintain a closed loop local economy.

 

Securing Kent’s Future - Budget Recovery Strategy regarding the following outcomes:

 

Objective 2: Delivering savings from identified opportunity areas to set a sustainable 2024/25 budget and MTFP: Contract Review

 

Financial Implications

 

The current budget for 2024/25 is £13,344,800 which covers operational 17 sites.

 

Payable Exit fees and costs associated with procurement (£250k), demobilisation and remobilisation (£450k) are unbudgeted pressures.This will bring several sites up to an ongoing serviceable standard which may be required before they are handed over to a new provider to maintain.

 

These costs can be treated in several ways, KCC can either pay it at the close of the contract, it can be included in the procurement as a set up cost or amortised over a period of time but will remain a budget pressure

 

There is a risk to the delivery of MTFP savings during the procurement process, which will need to be managed with the incumbent contractors. Going forward these improvements may be included in the new contract specification and therefore can be priced and secured in open competition. 

 

A procurement process will enable KCC to be satisfied that it is paying the current market rate for these services and economies of scale may help to drive efficiencies in the service. However, there is no guarantee that the tendered price will be more attractive than the current price.

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Environment

Decision due date: Not before 15/06/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Execuctive Decision regulations

Lead officer: susan Reddick

Notice of decision: 17/05/2024

Anticipated restriction: Part exempt  - view reasons


11/06/2024 - 24/00046 - KCC CLS Adult Education Funding Reform

Proposed decision

 

For KCC Community Learning and Skills (CLS) to change its delivery model to meet its contractual obligations as set out under the new Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) rules which come into effect from 1st August 2024.

 

Reason for the decision

 

Following funding changes by the Department for Education (DfE) / Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA), which will come into effect from 1st August 2024, KCC Community Learning and Skills (CLS) must undertake significant reform if it is to continue to deliver vital core skills to the residents of Kent and remain within the new terms of the funding contract.

 

While much of the provision will remain the same, it is expected that the reforms would alter some of the types of courses offered, the customer base and the delivery locations particularly for the Creative and Personal Development components.

 

A decision is required in response to the Department for Education (DfE) reforms in relation to further education funding, which will require a change to KCC CLS service business model.

 

 

Background

 

Community Learning and Skills (CLS) is KCC’s internally commissioned department to deliver Education and Training to adults and young people over 16. It delivers core subjects like English and maths, and has a long history of a creative arts curriculum as well as languages, fitness and humanities. CLS are responsible for delivering the Education & Skills Funding Agency Adult Education Budget (AEB) on behalf of KCC, which support the goals and objectives of Framing Kent’s Future. 

 

CLS provide and secure learning opportunities for Kent’s residents which:

·         engage and build confidence, preparing them for further learning and employment,

·         improve essential skills in areas such English, ESOL, maths, digital skills,

·         equip parents/carers to support children’s learning,

·         improve health and wellbeing to develop strong, integrated communities.

 

From the new academic year, starting on 1st August 2024, the DfE/ESFA are changing the AEB to become the Adult Skills Fund (ASF) which introduces significant alterations to the funding rules and how the funding should be utilised.

 

These reforms refocus how funding is used with the new focus being to reskill and upskill adults for work, and to move funding away from courses taken purely for leisure / pleasure purposes. The reforms will benefit learners through the stronger link between the training available to them and the employment opportunities in their local area. New Annual Accountability Statements for grant-funded FE providers, like KCC/CLS, requires them to outline their plans to contribute to local and national skills needs.

 

Other key points to note from the funding reforms:

 

·         Learning for leisure and pleasure is no longer fundable or to be subsidised via the Adult Skills Fund.The courses impacted include many of the creative (art / crafts) and language courses.

·         Learners classified as repeat learners (learners who have attended the same type of course, completing a full level) will be expected to progress to the next level, move to a different type of course or move into ‘self-organised learning’ which may be at an increased cost to the learner.  This accounts for around 41% of KCC/CLS current learners.

·         All learning by an individual must be categorised into a ‘Primary Purpose’ from one of the following seven areas: Engaging and/or building confidence; Preparation for further learning; Preparation for employment; Improving essential skills including English, ESOL, Maths and Digital; Equipping parents/carers to support children's learning; Health and well-being; Developing stronger communities.

 

KCC CLS is proposing to make changes to its delivery model to ensure itmeets contractual obligations and gives even more focus to Local Skills Improvement Plan (LSIP) priorities around skills gaps, and local needs. This would also include qualification and non-qualification courses leading towards working in Creative industries, as well as for example, language courses to support work in employers who require bi-lingual skills e.g. Border Force. Whilst learning for leisure/pleasure would not be included in this option, Creative and Fitness courses as a vehicle to support health and wellbeing would be delivered, and Creative and language courses would still be included for an individual for a defined period, as they sit within ESFA funding rules. Examples of the learning aims possible would be provided in the report presented to Cabinet Committee.

 

Sub-contracting opportunities will be explored where CLS do not have existing staff base, for example, particular vocational sectors.

 

This is the preferred option, on the basis that this option holds fewer financial risks for KCC long term and will also enable an undivided focus on achieving the KCC strategic aims and those outlined within the ESFA contract.

 

 

Options (other options considered but discarded)

 

Option 2 – Contract plus Learner Funded Business Unit

This would be as option 1, alteration of our business model to meet the terms of the new contract, but with the addition of a commercial unit in the form of Learner Funded Business Unit (LFBU). The LFBU could help replace the offer for learners whose courses are now excluded from ESFA funding. These learners would pay for their courses without recourse to concessions or discounts. KCC CLS would deliver in each district according to identified demand and building suitability. Estimates for fees are variable, but biggest increases would be for specialist courses requiring specialist equipment at circa 100% higher than the equivalent subsidised course rate.

 

Option 3 – Close KCC CLS

This option has two variables, as KCC could a) return the contract to DfE/ESFA or

b) commission/sub-contract delivery to external providers. With ‘b’, KCC would still, as the contract holder, retain the responsibility for quality, data, compliance, OFSTED inspections etc.

 

Option 4 - Do nothing:

CLS would continue with the present offer including courses for learners which will be precluded from funding but with equivalent course pricing structures as now and in the buildings presently occupied.

 

 

 

How the proposed decision supports Framing Kent's Future - Our Council Strategy 2022-2026

 

The changes will support KCC’s ambitions by:

  • focussing on demographics within local communities to deliver improvements in adult educational attainment, skills and employment rates and economy.
  • forging a greater relationship and joint working with Public Health to improve the health of the population.
  • supporting KCC Infrastructure in strategic planning of new housing developments to ensure the provision of education is available at the point of need.
  • supporting rural communities in their access to education
  • providing opportunities for people to develop their confidence and ability to build a stronger community.
  • reviewing the CLS occupied KCC freehold estate and relocate to more carbon efficient premises.
  • offering more provision within local communities, thereby reducing carbon emissions through customer travel.
  • continuing to deliver the highly successful Family Learning and Response programmes which support many of the most vulnerable.


How the proposed decision supports Securing Kent’s Future

 

Implementing the proposals will contribute towards Objective 3 of securing Kent’s future:

- The transformation of the service, in line with the requirements of the grant funding and in response to changes in Government priorities, will aim to return the service to a self-funded model of delivery within 3 years and achieve financial sustainability in the longer term (recognising there will be a short-term pressure whilst this transformation takes place). The proposed model of delivery was considered the most cost effective option over the next 3 academic years. 

 

Financial Implications

 

 

The proposal involves changing the delivery model to adhere to the changes in funding. A restructure would be required which would result in a financial pressure to the Council in the region of £0.6m - £0.9m in 2024-25 financial year whilst the service adjusts to the new delivery model, with the expectation this pressure would be reduced in 25-26, and the service returning to a self-funded model by 2026-27 

 

 

It is anticipated there will be an initial reduction of enrolments but there would be future growth across the three years to mitigate the risk of contract reduction.

 

This model of delivery would still expect KCC CLS to seek opportunities to attract additional funding and additional fee income, through delivery of bespoke courses, for example to employers. There would be some fee income (earned outside of ESFA contract, where courses/need aligned with the Primary Purposes) and estimates circa £1.3m. Based on this assumption and the occupation of buildings suited to the new offer, it is anticipated that KCC CLS would be returning to a small surplus within three years.

 

The Revenue Budget for 2024-25, agreed by the Council in February 2024, expected CLS to be fully funded from a combination of external grants and fee income with the delivery of a small surplus of -£0.1m to support wider indirect overheads. When assessing the different options for the future of CLS, due to the estimated impact of the government funding from August 2024, it is likely there will be a short-term financial pressure on this service during 2024-25, this will be reported in the financial monitoring report presented to Cabinet. The Directorate will look to see what mitigating actions could be taken to offset this possible overspend. 

 

Staffing

 

There will be an impact to the CLS staffing base and particularly for tutors in the biggest impacted areas of Creative/CPD courses.There would be no implementation of staff changes prior to 1st August 2024, and headcount changes would not likely take place until the end of the year. This would add financial pressure which will be managed through a programme of activity to best utilise paid hours.

 

Property Assets

 

A reduction in set property assets will be vital for CLS to return to financial viability. Currently the dedicated fixed assets represent an annual revenue cost of over £2m in addition to the ad hoc facilities charges. Moving forward, under the preferred option, the service would require more short-term community-based venues that will alter based on the areas of most need. Moving to this more agile model of delivery would free up space to be considered for other KCC uses, and if the assets were surplus to KCCs requirements, they could return a significant capital receipt and also avoid the longer-term maintenance costs of those assets.

 

Equalities implications

 

An EqIA has been undertaken and will continue to be reviewed through the decision process. The EqIA has identified that the biggest, and most detrimental impacts to service users in the long term would have been from Options 3 (close the service or sub-contract provision) and Option 4 (do nothing).

Options 1 and 2 also identify impacts on those with protected characteristics these being:

·         Potential reduction to the service offer, particularly in learning for leisure with mitigation provided by either the introduction of a Learner-funded offer and/or signposting to alternative learning providers and the promotion of self-organised learning.

·         Potential reduced access, particularly for those who may, because of their protected characteristic, have limited financial means. There is limited mitigation by access to funding via tailored learning.

·         Older people may be more greatly affected because of their proportional representation within CLS and because they most often use classes for leisure purposes. Mitigation would be provided by either the introduction of a Learner-funded offer and/or signposting to alternative learning providers and the promotion of self-organised learning.

·         Those identifying as women may be more greatly impacted, again due to the proportional representation. For 23/24 thus far, participation is 78% female, 22% male.

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Education and Skills

Decision due date: Not before 26/06/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Executive Decision regulations

Notice of decision: 28/05/2024

Anticipated restriction: Open


05/06/2024 - 24/00026 - The Locality Model for Special Educational Needs Inclusion

Proposed decision

 

The Cabinet Member for Education and Skills to approve the adoption and implementation of the Locality Model for Special Educational Needs Inclusion in Kent

 

Reason for the decision

 

-     Adopting the Locality Model for Special Education Needs (SEN) Inclusion would be a step forwards in Kent County Council’s (KCC) commitment to delivering the priorities of the Countywide Approach to Inclusive Education (CATIE) Strategy. The CATIE Strategy is one of KCC’s responsibilities to implement the Designated Schools Grant management plan, as outlined in the Department for Education’s (DfE) Safety Valve Agreement with Kent.

 

-      Implementing the Locality Model will support increased inclusion in mainstream schools for children and young people with SEN. The Locality Model will be the framework that ensures KCC can deliver the most effective and appropriate High Needs Funding (HNF) allocations to local areas in Kent. The Locality Model will align with a new Kent SEN continuum being developed to span mainstream, specialist resource, and special school provisions, ensuring system-wide cohesion.

 

Background

 

-      In May 2023, at KCC’s Children Young People and Education (CYPE) Cabinet Committee, the CATIE was set out as KCC’s strategy for 2023-28. The CATIE established KCC’s collective ambitions for children, young people, and their families in Kent. Professionals working together in a collaborative, sustainable system to ensure equity of education, meaning children feel they belong, are respected, and valued as individuals, and are fully supported to achieve their best.    

 

-      The CATIE, signposted within the DfE’s Safety Valve Agreement with Kent, states it will “develop a school/area-led approach to […] SEN support services (Locality Based Resources), to better respond to the needs of children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND)”.

 

-       CATIE’s Priority Two aims to develop community working and implement structures that support children and young people with SEND in Kent to have their needs met within their own locality, wherever possible.

 

-      As part of KCC’s work towards delivering on CATIE priorities a Locality Model has been developed, with the aim of improving the outcomes for children and young people with SEND in Kent. This proposal went out to public consultation between November 2023 and January 2024.

 

Options (other options considered but discounted)

 

-      The process for developing the Locality Model was iterative and alternative options were considered within the development process, to ensure the direction proposed is the right one for Kent. The group involved in developing and defining our options consisted of KCC staff from education, finance, and SEN, alongside leaders of education from KCC mainstream primary and secondary schools (selective and non-selective), single and multi-Academy Trusts, special schools, and free schools.

 

-      Three main options were considered:

1)    to maintain the current system

2)    to implement a Tariff system

3)    to implement a Locality Model

 

-       Option one was discounted as an impracticable solution; it is not currently performing well in Kent, there iscurrent inconsistency in mainstream SEN inclusion and provision, along with a lack of effective monitoring systems and accountability. Ofsted have stated, poor standards are achieved, and progress made, by too many pupils with SEN under the current system.

 

-       Option two could have been viable but was discounted due to its identified limitations. A tariff system[1] for mainstream would provide clear and transparent arrangements with a prescriptive allocation of resources but tends to be used in conjunction with individual funding allocations for children with EHCPs, rather than for wider operations and funding of SEN Support Services. The elements of inflexibility it would bring were also considered too restrictive for SEN support services, and unsupportive of innovative use of resources for mainstream if used on its own.

 

-       Option three was viewed as the best path for KCC to explore and define further with partners. Research finds that more consistent and effective support in mainstream schools lead to positive outcomes for children and young people. Local authorities who make substantial use of peer moderation and mainstream collaboration have found that doing so improves consistency and is a useful source of advice and support. The Locality Model is designed to improve the quality of the mainstream education offer in Kent, through early and accurate identification of need, high quality teaching of a knowledge-rich curriculum, and timely access to specialist health and care support, and via alternative provision placements where they are needed.

 

-      Proposals for the Locality Model were agreed following intensive collaboration with schools, settings, and other key stakeholders, and then put out to consultation with parent/carers, young people, all professional stakeholders, and all members of the public.

 

-  Following consultation, subsequent analysis of feedback, and defining KCC’s response to consultation feedback, the Locality Model will be   presented to the CYPE Cabinet Committee.

 

How the proposed decision supports Securing Kent’s Future andFraming Kent's Future - Our Council Strategy 2022-2026

 

-      The Locality Model directly aligns with KCC’s strategic vison for children, young people, and families, as set out in ‘Framing Kent’s Future’. Priority 1: Levelling up Kent explains that: ‘We will maintain improvement support services for all Kent schools, including maintained schools and academies, to maintain Kent’s high-quality education system’. The Locality Model will implement structures that will increase the inclusion of children and young people with SEN in mainstream schools, so they can be educated with, and are able to access the same opportunities to education as their peers wherever possible. The aim is children and young people with SEN in Kent receive early and timely support. That greater numbers of children and young people are able to have their needs met within mainstream settings, or should they need specialist provision, that wherever possible they can access this locally, close to where they live.

 

-      Under the Locality Model structure, available resources will be discussed by groups of schools and other SEN, education, or healthcare professionals in the local area, to determine where resource and HNF allocations would be best directed. The final decision to allocate HNF will remain with KCC, but by discussions occurring locally KCC aim to make better use of resources. This activity is expected to support KCC with its Safety Valve aims to achieve financial sustainability in the longer term. This would align with priorities set out in Securing Kent’s Future, the next step on from Framing Kent’s Future, agreed at Cabinet in October 2023.

 

Financial Implications

 

-      Kent currently spends approximately £45m on specific high needs allocations to schools per annum. Approximately 40% of this are for SEN support services for individual children and the remainder to children with an EHCP. This is funded from the High Needs Block of the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG), a specific ring-fenced education grant from the Department of Education. The council is one of a number of local authorities which are part of the DfE Safety Valve Programme to support those councils with the highest overspends on SEN services to achieve a financially sustainable longer term position. The Kent’s Safety Valve agreement with the DfE states:

 

“The authority agrees to implement the DSG[2] management plan that it has set out. This includes action to:

 

3.1. Implement a countywide approach to ‘Inclusion Education’, to further build capacity in mainstream schools to support children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND), thus increasing the proportion of children successfully supported in mainstream education and reducing dependence on specialist provision

 

3.7. Ensure there is sufficient and consistent capacity across the county to support children with severe and complex needs in their local area where possible

 

3.8. Develop a school/area-led approach to commissioning of SEN support services (Locality Based Resources), to better respond to the needs of children and young people with SEND”

(page 2 and 3  DfE DSG ‘Safety Valve’ Agreement: Kent)

 

-      Kent must implement a sustainable approach to HNF to meet the DfE Safety Valve agreement and to ensure financial sustainability in this area moving forwards; the Locality Model will build the robust governance and monitoring processes required to implement the necessary new approach.

 

 



 

[2] Dedicated Schools Grant

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Education and Skills

Decision due date: Not before 22/05/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Division affected: (All Division);

Lead officer: Roger Silk

Notice of decision: 23/04/2024

Anticipated restriction: Open


05/06/2024 - 24/00051 - Commissioning of a Direct Payment Support Service Contract for Children and Young People

Proposed decision

 

That the Cabinet Member for Integrated Children’s Services  approve the commencement of a formal procurement for a new Direct Payment Support Service commencing 1 April 2025 to 31 March 2028, with the option to extend up to a further 24-months.

 

Reason for the decision

 

To commit the budget for a commissioned Direct Payment Support Service in place of the current service that is due to end on 31 March 2025 and to formally authorise the commencement of a procurement.

 

Background

 

As part of the support planning process, Direct Payments (DPs) are offered to individuals to provide a greater choice and control over their care and support arrangements. They are monetary payments that can be made to individuals to meet some or all of their eligible support needs. Direct Payments for parents or carers of disabled children are a statutory duty under the Children Act 1989 as amended by Sections 17A (inserted by the Health and Social Care Act 2001) and 17B (inserted by the Carers and Disabled Children Act 2000).

 

Currently, the Direct Payment Support Service is delivered by a not-for-profit provider of Children’s and Young People Services. The service is open to:

• Parents and carers of disabled children

• Parents and carers of children with special educational needs

• Young people aged 16-25 with special educational needs

• Young disabled people aged 16-25

 

The current Direct Payment Support Service ends on 31 March 2025 with all available extensions enacted. The current provider has performed well against Key Performance Indicators and there is a need to procure this service from 1 April 2025.

 

Options (other options considered but discarded)

 

1)        Do nothing. The contract will end on the 31 March 2025 and alternative arrangements for the ongoing administration, and support, for Children Young People and Education Direct Payments. Currently there is no internal team that undertake this work for Children and Young People Direct Payments and there is a substantial risk that the Authority will not meet its statutory obligations.

 

2)        Commission an enhanced service which includes the recruitment and retention of Personal Assistants in addition to the set up and monitoring of Direct Payments. Engagement with DP recipients and users of the service identified a key reason for poor recruitment and retention of PAs is the low wage rate. The contract is not able to review wage rates for PA’s as wage rates are set by the DP recipient within the available budget, set by the Local Authority. The appetite for additional spend with no guarantee of a clear cost benefit is low given the councils current financial situation. This option is discounted.

 

The proposed Decision is in line with Kent’s Strategy for Children and Young People with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities 2021-2024

 

Priority One: Improve the way we work with children and young people, parents and carers. Qualitative feedback from parents, carers and young people using the service remains extremely high. The survey indicates that as of March 2022 100% of service users rate the support they receive as ‘good’ or ‘excellent’, and a similar number stated that the knowledge of the worker provided tosupport them was ‘good’ or ‘excellent’

 

Framing Kent’s Future Council Strategy 2022-2026:

 

Priority 4: New models of care and support: Our commitment is to reshape our commissioning practice to ensure we build strategic partnerships with our providers, through earlier engagement, more consistent and proactive commissioning practice, and a stronger focus on co-designing services.

 

Our commitment is to support the most vulnerable children and families in our county, ensuring our social work practice supports manageable caseloads, reflective learning, joined up safeguarding and effective corporate parenting arrangements.

 

In addition to Framing Kent’s Future, the Council has recently published ‘Securing Kent’s Future – The Budget Recovery Strategy’ which underpins any spending decisions and makes clear that the Council must adhere to its ‘Best Value’ statutory responsibility.  The proposal for this service adheres to the principles of the strategy

 

The statutory Best Value duty must frame all financial, service and policy decisions from this point forward, and services must pro-actively evidence the best value considerations in all decisions. Without ensuring best value, we will not be capable of meeting our wider statutory duties, and the services which flow from them, upon which our residents rely.

 

As outlined in Objective 2 of the strategy, Commissioners are ensuring any future opportunity for Adult Social Care to jointly commission a Direct Payment Support Service in the near future by ensuring a break clause is written into the contract and the initial term comes to an end after three years.

 

The Direct Payment Support Service seeks to maximise the number of Direct Payments in the county in line with; Securing Kent’s Future’ by optimising support for people between the ages of 14-25 as they transition from children to adult services, promoting independence in adult life.

 

 

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Integrated Children's Services

Decision due date: Not before 04/07/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Executive Decision regulations

Lead officer: Christy Holden

Notice of decision: 05/06/2024

Anticipated restriction: Open


31/05/2024 - 24/00047 - Services provided by The Education People

Proposed decision

 

To reduce the value of the core contract with The Education People in 2024/25 by £0.9m through changes to the service specification.

 

Reason for the decision

 

As part of KCC’s budget setting process discussions have taken place with TEP’s leadership to assess areas of efficiency.  Proposals for £0.9m of savings in 2024-25 have been received. 

 

It is expected that through further efficiency work with TEP, savings of £300k will be achieved in 2025/26.  Any delivered saving in excess of the £900k in 2024/25 will help towards the £300k in 2025/26.

 

Options (other options considered but discarded)

 

The alternative to reducing the value of the TEP contract by £0.9m is to secure savings elsewhere in the Education Service budget.  Delivery of the MTFP savings (£1.2m in 2024/25) requires action in addition to the proposals in this paper.  The proposals represent a fair balance as to where savings are being made.

 

It is feasible to consider finding different savings from within the TEP contract to those included in the proposals.  However, the proposals offer savings which best align with the Council’s statutory duties, from areas where activity levels have changed, areas where responsibility for funding these should rightly fall to other parties, and areas which are believed to add least value. 

 

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Education and Skills

Decision due date: Not before 10/06/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Division affected: (All Division);

Lead officer: David Adams

Notice of decision: 07/05/2024

Anticipated restriction: Part exempt  - view reasons


30/05/2024 - 24/00037 - MTW (Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust) – 12-month Partnership Extension

Proposed decision

 

The proposed decision is to extend the current MTW (Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust) partnership contract that is due to expire 31st March 2025 (for a period of 12 months to 31st March 2026), to support the work across the Public Health Transformation programme.

 

Reason for the decision

 

Public Health are undertaking a comprehensive review of Public Health funded services as part of a transformation programme. The programme of work is complex and some of the contracts expire at the same time because they form part of a partnership with MTW (Maidstone and  Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust). The services delivered by MTW are highly specialised and there is a limited market of alternative providers.

 

The proposal is to extend the KCHFT partnership so that the transformation work can continue, in a way that does not de-stabilise, service delivery, workforce and minimises the impact to staff, residents and providers. It also allows time for interdependencies and joint commissioning to be fully considered.

 

 

Background

 

The purpose of the Public Health Transformation programme is to improve future services, with the following aims: -

1)    Delivering best value and to spend the Public Grant in a way that delivers the biggest impact.

2)    Improving services for Kent residents, targeting people who need services the most, with services being informed by evidence, joined up and aligned internally and with other related services.

3)    Ensuring that services are fit for the future, sustainable and responsive to need
This includes managing changes in demand, ensuring provider capacity and capability, being insights led, responding to societal changing trends and utilising new technology. Focusing on prevention, reducing health inequalities.

 

Services that are in-scope are funded through the ring-fenced Public Health grant (and do not draw on KCC core funding). 

The transformation programme brings many opportunities for example, changing suppliers (on some services this may produce a saving), consideration of bringing services in house, aligning commissioning with external organisations, changing delivery model and delivering potential savings by operating services differently.

 

MTW entered into a Co-Operation Agreement with Kent County Council on 3rd May 2019 and this agreement expires on 31st March 2025.

 

MTW provide KCC with West Kent sexual health services, HIV services and online sexual health testing across the county.

The MTW partnership was put in place in 2019 and has supported the delivery of a number of shared objectives such as; influencing public health systems, reducing health inequalities, delivering innovation and improving efficiency. The partnership has enabled the successful management of significant challenges including financial pressures. It has supported stability for the workforce, in turn delivering high quality services across Kent.

 

The transformation programme is complex, with many interdependencies such as ICB recommissioning, Family Hubs funding, OHID grants, as well as cross-cutting themes that are common across services, such as workforce training, quality and property.


Significant care is needed maintain statutory services delivered to Kent residents, to ensure that the workforce is not destabilised and to manage internal and external staffing resources associated with the contractual partnership changes.

 

The recommendation is to put in place a twelve-month extension for the partnership.

 

The benefits of taking this approach are that the work will progress where it is possible to progress quickly, but where there are details still to be worked through, due time and consideration are given.

This approach will also ensure that Public Health and Integrated Commissioning teams have the capacity to deliver the large-scale transformation and that due diligence is taken in relation to the new Healthcare procurement legislation (see legal section). 

 

A partnership extension would help to:

  • Minimise risk of destabilising the workforce; these are specialist roles and as the end of the contract approaches staff may choose to move organisation. The change of service model and/or supplier needs to be carefully managed.
  • Maximise interdependencies – this is a complex programme with many interdependencies and sufficient time is needed to explore and consider these in full. For example, HIV commissioning which is currently part of this service but funded by NHSE (NHS England) and due to transfer to the ICB (NHS Kent and Medway Integrated Care Board).
  • Allow time to balance resources of Public Health and Integrated Commissioning staff in KCC across a number of recommissioning programmes.
  • Develop comprehensive business cases for alternative and financially costed service models.
  • Develop understanding and application of new procurement legislation by taking a stagged approach across the transformation.
  • Build further insights (both service user insights and insights with underserved communities who do not currently access services, but may benefit from accessing services)
  • Build engagement with existing providers and other providers in the market and help to shape commissioning models.

 

Performance and quality of the services delivered by MTW are currently good, with the provider meeting set targets (targets that are regularly reviewed).

 

Sexual Health services provide good return on investment (ROI), with LARC (Long Acting Reversible Contraception) providing £13:£1 ROI and Online STI services delivering a £2.5:£1 ROI. [1]

 

During the extension year, all parties will remain committed to delivering efficiencies and financial savings, in line with current terms to ensure best value. KCC will continue to closely monitor expenditure alongside quality and performance. 

 

The proposed twelve-month MTW partnership extension will include contract break clauses.

 

Any service changes / updates required prior to the next partnership agreement decision would need to be managed via new decisions.

 

Options (other options considered but discarded)

 

The alternative options, considered but disregarded include: -

 

Option 1 - Re-procuring services and putting in place new contracts for 1st April 2025. This option has been dis-regarded because there would be little time and officer capacity to ensure services offer the best value and will not allow time to explore alternative service delivery models. With the extension, the service and the workforce will, as a result, not be de-stabilised and service quality will not be compromised.

Option 2 – Contracting outside of the partnership This option is not considered suitable in the short-term as the partnership offers Kent, high quality, stable services within a financial envelop that offers value for money, operating within a partnership. The risk of discontinuing these services in the partnership, at this time, could have an adverse impact on the provider, their workforces and quality.

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supporting KCC’s Strategy

Securing Kent’s Future

This approach aligns with Securing Kent’s Future and the council’s Best Value statutory responsibility.

Public Health services are preventative services with evidence of good Return on Investment. The services also ensure that we support reductions in demand into other KCC services and across the health system.

Extending the two (MTW and KCHFT) current partnerships for twelve months, ensures that transformation can take place in a way that minimises potential risks (and associated costs) and takes advantage of future service options that will provide the best value for Kent and its residents.  It supports the following objectives: -

 

Objective 4 – Further transforming the operating model of the Council

 

The transformation programme offers the opportunity to review Public Health services and to ensure services are efficient, offer best value and are sustainable.

 

Framing Kent’s Future
The Transformation Programme aligns with KCC’s ‘Framing Kent’s Future’ and in particular: -

 

Levelling up Kent – Public Health services will remain focused on reducing health inequalities across the county and where needed most.

New models of Care and Support – the Public Health transformation programme will review existing services and ensure they are efficient and sustainable.

 

The transformation programme also supports the NHS Kent and Medway Integrated Care Board.

Procurement legislation

Integrated Commissioning have sought internal and external legal advice on the matter of extending the partnership due to the new and untested nature of the new PSR procurement regulations. The advice received is detailed below.

On the basis that the main subject matter of the KCHFT agreement is healthcare services, and providing that the agreement was entered into pursuant to regulation 12(7) of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 (PCR), the agreement falls to be treated as an agreement for healthcare services for the purposes of the Health Care Services (Provider Selection Regime) Regulations 2023 (“PSR”).

 

The PSR regulations provide a few grounds for making a contract modification without having to follow a new PSR procurement process.

 

Depending on the confirmation of the contract values involved, Regulation 13(1)(d) of the PSR provides a ground to rely upon for the agreement to be extended provided that the terms of the extension would not render the contract materially different in character and the cumulative change in the lifetime value of the contract since it was entered into or concluded would be less than 25% of the lifetime value of the original contract when it was entered into or concluded.

 

It should be noted that if relying upon this ground, the Council must submit a notice of the modification for publication on the UK e-notification service in relation to the agreement, within 30 days of the modification as the extension is worth more than £500,000.

 



[1] Kent Public Health Observatory 2023, based on national evidence.

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Adult Social Care and Public Health

Decision due date: Not before 30/05/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Division affected: (All Division);

Lead officer: Vicky Tovey

Notice of decision: 01/05/2024


30/05/2024 - 24/00036 - KCHFT (Kent Community Health NHS Foundation Trust) (twelve-month) partnership extension

Proposed decision

The proposed decision is to extend the current KCHFT (Kent Community Health Foundation Trust) partnership contract that is due to expire 31st March 2025 (for a period of 12 months to 31st March 2026), to support the work across the Public Health Transformation programme.

Reason for the decision

 

Public Health are undertaking a comprehensive review of Public Health funded services as part of a transformation programme. The programme of work is complex and many of the contracts expire at the same time. This is because they form part of a partnership with Kent Community Health Foundation Trust (KCHFT).

 

The proposal is to extend the KCHFT partnership so that the transformation work can continue, in a way that does not de-stabilise, service delivery, workforce and minimises the impact to staff, residents and providers. It also allows time for interdependencies and joint commissioning to be fully considered.

Background

 

The purpose of the Public Health Transformation programme is to improve future services, with the following aims: 

-       Delivering best value and to spend the Public Health Grant in a way that delivers the biggest impact.

-       Improving services for Kent residents, targeting people who need services the most, with services being informed by evidence, joined up and aligned internally and with other related services.

-       Ensuring that services are fit for the future, sustainable and responsive to need. This includes managing changes in demand, ensuring provider capacity and capability, being insights led, responding to societal changing trends and utilising new technology. Focusing on prevention, reducing health inequalities.

 

The programme is reviewing twenty-one Public Health funded service areas simultaneously to help explore options for integration, efficiency and maximising impact. Many of the services in the review expire at the same time as they form part of an overarching partnership contract with Kent Community Health Foundation Trust. This includes many mandated services such as health visiting and sexual health. The partnership was put in place in March 2017[1] and has supported the delivery of a number of shared objectives such as; influencing public health systems, reducing health inequalities, delivering innovation and improving efficiency.

Performance and quality of service delivery during the partnership has been very good, with KCHFT consistently meeting set targets (targets that are regularly reviewed). Many of the services delivered by KCHFT are specialised services.

 

The recommendation is to put in place a twelve-month extension for the partnership to support the delivery of the transformation programme.

 

A partnership extension would help to:

  • Minimise risk of destabilising the workforce; these are specialist roles and as the end of the contract approaches staff may choose to move organisation. The change of service model and/or supplier needs to be carefully managed.
  • Maximise interdependencies – this is a complex programme with many interdependencies and sufficient time is needed to explore and consider these in full. For example, HIV commissioning which is currently part of this service but funded by NHSE (NHS England) and due to transfer to the ICB (NHS Kent and Medway Integrated Care Board).
  • Allow time to balance resources of Public Health and Integrated Commissioning staff in KCC across a number of recommissioning programmes.
  • Develop comprehensive business cases for alternative and financially costed service models.
  • Develop understanding and application of new procurement legislation by taking a stagged approach across the transformation.
  • Build further insights (both service user insights and insights with underserved communities who do not currently access services, but may benefit from accessing services)
  • Build engagement with existing providers and other providers in the market and help to shape commissioning models.

 

The partnership extension would help ensure service stability, whilst fully exploring alternative service delivery options and putting new contracts in place. During the transformation work, some services would not use the full twelve-month extension. New, staggered contract start dates would be put in place for services. Some services (substance misuse) are likely to start new contracts in January 2025, because there is little change in delivery and greater clarity on model. Other services may start new contracts later in the year, because they want to align with external commissioning opportunities or because there are opportunities to deliver the services differently by competitive procurement or insourcing.

Any substantive service change or updates required prior to the next partnership agreement decision would be managed via fresh decisions. 

 

The proposed twelve-month partnership extension would include contract break clauses.

 

All parties will remain committed to delivering efficiencies and financial savings in the extension year in line with current terms to ensure best value. KCC will closely monitor expenditure alongside performance. 

 

It is important during the Public Health Transformation programme review, not to de-stabilise the existing supplier, KCHFT. KCHFT delivers a number of services for both KCC and the Kent and Medway ICB (Integrated Care Board), therefore it is important for KCC and the wider health system to ensure this supplier and any potential change, is managed carefully in order to not disrupt KCC’s services and also services provided by KCHFT for the ICB. There is an extremely limited choice of alternative providers in the market.

 

 

Options (other options considered but discarded)

 

The alternative options, considered but disregarded include: -

 

1)    Option 1 - Re-procuring services and putting in place new contracts for 1st April 2025. This option has been dis-regarded because there would be little time and officer capacity to ensure services offer the best value and will not allow time to explore alternative service delivery models. With the extension, the service and the workforce will, as a result, not be de-stabilised and service quality will not be compromised.

2)    Option 2 – Contracting outside of the partnership This option is not considered suitable in the short-term as the partnership offers Kent, high quality, stable services within a financial envelop that offers value for money, operating within a partnership. The risk of discontinuing these services in the partnership, at this time, could have an adverse impact on the provider, their workforces and quality.

 

 

Supporting KCC’s Strategy

Securing Kent’s Future

This approach aligns with Securing Kent’s Future and the council’s Best Value Statutory responsibility.

Public Health services are preventative services with evidence of good Return on Investment and can help. reduce demand into other KCC services and across the health system.

Extending the two current partnerships for twelve months, ensures that transformation can take place in a way that minimises potential risks (and associated costs) and takes advantage of future service options that will provide the best value for Kent and its residents.  It supports the following objectives: -

 

Objective 4 – Further transforming the operating model of the Council

 

The transformation programme offers the opportunity to review Public Health services and to ensure services are efficient, offer best value and are sustainable.

 

 

Framing Kent’s Future
The Transformation Programme aligns with KCC’s ‘Framing Kent’s Future’ and in particular: -

 

Levelling up Kent – Public Health services will remain focused on reducing health inequalities across the county and where needed most.

New models of Care and Support – the Public Health transformation programme will review existing services and ensure they are efficient and sustainable.

 

The transformation programme also supports the NHS Kent and Medway  Integrated Care Board.

 

Procurement legislation

Integrated Commissioning have sought internal and external legal advice on the matter of extending the partnership due to the new and untested nature of the new PSR procurement regulations. The advice received is detailed below.

On the basis that the main subject matter of the KCHFT agreement is healthcare services, and providing that the agreement was entered into pursuant to regulation 12(7) of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 (PCR), the agreement falls to be treated as an agreement for healthcare services for the purposes of the Health Care Services (Provider Selection Regime) Regulations 2023 (“PSR”).

 

The PSR regulations provide a few grounds for making a contract modification without having to follow a new PSR procurement process. Depending on the confirmation of the contract values involved, Regulation 13(1)(d) of the PSR provides a ground to rely upon for the agreement to be extended provided that the terms of the extension would not render the contract materially different in character and the cumulative change in the lifetime value of the contract since it was entered into or concluded would be less than 25% of the lifetime value of the original contract when it was entered into or concluded.

 

It should be noted that if relying upon this ground, the Council must submit a notice of the modification for publication on the UK e-notification service in relation to the agreement, within 30 days of the modification as the extension is worth more than £500,000.

 

 



Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Adult Social Care and Public Health

Decision due date: Not before 30/05/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Division affected: (All Division);

Lead officer: Vicky Tovey

Notice of decision: 01/05/2024


09/05/2024 - 24/00045 - KCC CLS Accountability Statement

Proposed decision:

 

The Cabinet Member for Education and Skills to agree the Accountability Statement.

 

Reason for the decision:

 

The decision is required to meet DfE requirement for an Annual Accountability Statement, as part of the contractual annual Accountability Agreement.

 

Background:

 

Accountability Agreements were introduced by the DfE in the 2023 to 2024 academic year and consist of a 2-part document setting the overall expectations of providers (including local authorities delivering more than £1 million of post -16 provision) in return for funding. The agreement focusses on what colleges, designated institutions and local authorities deliver in the year ahead and how they intend to support local, regional, and national needs. These annual Statements should in all cases be informed by providers’ longer term strategic plans and ambitions and (for those institutions within scope) the actions and outcomes from the Local Needs Duty.

 

Part 1 of the agreement is the ‘accountability framework’. DfE are using it to set out National Skills Priorities as well as the essential terms and conditions that providers need to meet in return for funds. Part 1 identifies required levers to ensure the effective management and assurance of public funds, the protection of learners as well as requiring sound governance.

 

Part 2, the ‘annual Accountability Statement’ is a provider document that is owned by KCC/ CLS as the provider and should set out a small number of outcome targets for areas of curriculum that providers are planning to change for the coming year. These targets reflect contributions to priorities outlined in Local Skills Improvement Plans (LSIPs), being led by Employer Representative Bodies (ERBs) working with employers, providers and local stakeholders including MCAs, local authorities, and other agencies and to National Skills Priorities listed below. Local authority learning organisations within scope should make reference to their tailored learning provision, particularly where this meets local skills needs.

 

Providers must submit their next annual Accountability Statement to the DfE by 30 June 2024.

 

How the proposed decision supports the Framing Kent's Future - Our Council Strategy 2022-2026 :

 

Implementing the proposals will contribute towards the following priorities:

 

Priority 1: LEVELLING UP KENT:

·   To support the Kent economy to be resilient and successfully adapt to the challenges and opportunities it faces over the coming years.

·   To work with partners to develop a skills system for Kent that delivers skills that are resilient to changing workforce needs and opportunities and supports people to higher level skills.

 

How the proposed decision supports Securing Kent’s Future:

Implementing the proposals will contribute towards Objective 2 and Objective 3 of securing Kent’s future:

- the 2024-25 budget included the assumption ESFA funding would be used to support the continual delivery of CLS, not securing this funding would lead to a significant overspend whether the service is continued or not. Therefore, this is avoiding the significant negative financial impact of not accepting this funding. 

- The transformation of the service, in line with the accountability statement and in response to changes in Government priorities, will aim to return to self-funded model of delivery and financial sustainability in the longer term (recognising there may be a short-term pressure whilst this transformation takes place).

 

Financial Implications:

 

The annual accountability statement is required to secure the majority of the revenue funding needed to support the operation of Community Learning & Skills service (CLS, is also supplemented by fee income). This funding is also conditional on meeting additional criteria. CLS aims to be a self-funded service, with direct costs, funded from either the ESFA funding and supplementary fee income. The strategic aims of the ESFA funding is changing and will require the Council to consider changes in services provided which is expected to lead to a short term deficit, where costs will be higher than income received, as the service changes to meet the new requirements.    

 

The ESFA funding contracts covered by the accountability statement are the Adult Skills Fund, comprising Tailored learning and Adult Skills core, Free courses for jobs and the 16-19 Education contract. The annual value (indicative for 24/25) of these contracts is £ 9,520,878 and are broken down as follows:

 

·         Tailored Learning £6,705,376

·         Adult Skills Core £1,995,762

·         Free Courses for Jobs £90,296

·         16-19 Education £729,444

 

The tailored learning funding is a fixed grant which is intended to support the Council in delivering its agreed identified learning aims which are set in line with the ESFA strategic aims of the grant. The amount of funding received for the other funding categories is dependent on either the number of specific qualifications achieved by learners, or the number of learners taking part in specific courses.

 

In the case that the ESFA does not receive a suitably authorised accountability statement, funding will not be provided to KCC. The accountability statement constitutes a contractual obligation and as such the ESFA makes clear that failure to comply will result in payments being frozen.

 

Without this funding the service would either need to be funded by the Council’s general fund (i.e. council tax) or the service would need to cease.

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Education and Skills

Decision due date: Not before 05/06/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Notice of decision: 07/05/2024

Anticipated restriction: Open


23/04/2024 - 24/00025 - Expansion of Northfleet Technology College, Colyer Rd, Northfleet, Gravesend, DA11 8BG

Proposed decision:

 

The Cabinet Member for Education and Skills is asked to:

 

  1. APPROVE the expansion of Northfleet Technology College from a PAN of 165 to a PAN of 189.

 

  1. AGREE to allocate the funding from the CYPE Capital Budget that will be required to complete the project.

 

  1. DELEGATE authority to the Director of Infrastructure to, in consultation with the Director of Education, enter into any necessary contracts or other legal agreements, as required to implement this decision; and

 

  1. AGREE for the Director of Infrastructure to be the nominated Authority Representative within the relevant agreements, with authority to enter variations as envisaged under the contracts.

 

 

Reason for the decision

 

This proposal to expand Northfleet Technology College has been developed because the Kent Commissioning Plan 2024/28 indicates that there will be a shortfall in year 7 places in the Gravesham and Longfield Non-Selective planning group.

 

Northfleet Technology College, a member of the Northfleet Schools Co-Operative Trust, is a boys secondary school.  Following an inspection that took place in October 2022, Ofsted deems Northfleet Technology College to be a ‘GOOD’ school, in all areas.

 

Following initial discussions, Northfleet Technology College agreed to offer 189 places on a temporary basis in 2023. This agreement has been repeated for September 2024. This proposal seeks to make the expansion permanent and so the senior management and governors of Northfleet Technology College have agreed to consult on this proposal to permanently expand the school and enlarge the secondary provision within the school by the addition of 25 places per school year.

           

If no further action is taken in the longer term, Kent County Council will find it extremely difficult to provide sufficient secondary school places in the Gravesham and Longfield Non-Selective planning group.

 

 

Background

 

Gravesham Borough’s population is increasing with more families moving into the area and as a result, Kent County Council needs to add additional secondary school places to manage the increase in demand. One strategy for providing additional school places is to expand existing successful and popular schools.

 

The Northfleet Technology College does not have sufficient accommodation to offer the requisite additional places, so as a temporary measure, four mobile teaching rooms will be placed on the site.  This will be a revenue expense.

 

KCC will design and construct a new standalone block to be ready for the September 2026 intake.  This will need to be funded from the CYPE Capital Budget.

 

 

Securing Kent’s Future

 

The 'Securing Kent's Future' strategy outlines the measures that KCC intend to take to ensure that Kent remains financially stable, now and long into the future.  It describes the statutory priorities, one of which being the statutory duty to ensure sufficient school places are available to any child or young person who requires one.  This duty applies to Special Educational Needs (SEN) provision, as well as mainstream settings.

 

This proposal is necessary for KCC to continue to deliver the statutory duty, in a cost-effective way, in line with the guidelines described in the Securing Kent's Future strategy. It will help to maintain KCC’s strategic role in supporting schools in Kent to deliver accessible, high quality education provision for all families.

 

The County Council’s Commissioning Plan for Education Provision in Kent 2024-28 is a five-year rolling plan which is updated annually.  It sets out KCC’s future plans as Strategic Commissioner of Education Provision across all types and phases of education in Kent. A copy of the latest plan can be viewed from this link:

 

https://www.kent.gov.uk/education-and-children/schools/education-provision/education-provision-plan

 

 

Financial Implications

 

Capital

 

Progression of the scheme will be dependent on the outcome of detailed feasibility and design work – these will inform the full overall cost of the project.

 

The cost of the new standalone block will be borne by the CYPE Capital Budget.  Currently the estimated cost for the whole scheme is £8.3m.  This sum has been included within the Basic Need Capital Programme that was recently agreed by Council. KCC Project Managers will be undertaking continuous checks to keep build costs as close as possible to this estimate.

 

Northfleet Technology College is a Public Finance Initiative (PFI) school. The PFI Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) have been on board from the start of the project and a change notice is in place for the Deed of Variation (DoV). The works will result in part of the land being removed from the PFI red line. Forecast legal costs for the DoV will be included within the total project cost for the main capital works.

 

An allowance of up to £2,500 may be payable to the school, to outfit each new teaching room with appropriate ICT equipment, such as touch screens or projection equipment.  This will be met from the overall Capital allocation for this project.

 

Should the scheme not proceed through to completion, any costs incurred at the time of cessation would become abortive costs and are likely to be recharged to Revenue. This would be reported through the regular financial monitoring reports to Cabinet.

 

Revenue

 

The initial phase involves the installation of four mobile teaching rooms at a cost of £311,168.  This will be a Revenue expense, funded from the Mobiles and Temporary Accommodation Budget included within the Education Revenue Budget.

 

As the scheme progresses, £6,000 per newly created learning space, would be provided towards the cost of furniture and equipment, such as tables, desks, chairs, cabinets and learning resources.

 

The school would also receive funding for the additional pupils that it admits in line with the funding allocated to schools through KCC’s Schools Funding Formula.

 

Both the £6,000 per classroom, and the additional pupil funding will be met from the Growth Funding provision held within the dedicated school's grant.

 

 

Human

 

The school will appoint additional staff as required; utilising revenue funding allocated through the Schools Funding Formula for these additional pupils.

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Education and Skills

Decision due date: Not before 22/05/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Lead officer: Ian Watts

Notice of decision: 23/04/2024

Anticipated restriction: Open


04/03/2024 - 24/00008 - Special Educational Needs - Therapy Contracts

Proposed decision:

 

A) Retrospectively contract with the East Kent Hospitals Trust and the Kent Community Health Foundation Trust for 1 April 2023 to 31 March 2024 for the provision of SEN Therapies

 

B) Contract with the East Kent Hospitals Trust and the Kent Community Health Foundation Trust for 1 April 2024 to 31 August 2025 for the provision of SEN Therapies

 

C) Agree to the review of the Kent and Medway Communication and Assistive Technology service and to incorporate into the wider recommissioning of SEN Therapies

 

D) Agree for the exploration of joint commissioning with the NHS for the wider provision of SEN Therapies to include in the re-procurement of NHS Community Services

 

E) Delegate authority to the Corporate Director of Children, Young People and Education, in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Education and Skills and the Corporate Director of Finance, to take relevant actions, including but not limited to, entering into and finalising the terms of relevant contracts or other legal agreements, as necessary, to implement the decision

 

 

Reason for the decision

 

To continue with annual contracts, issued by NHS Providers, for the current Special Educational Needs (SEN) Therapy services. The future commissioning intentions are to align with the NHS Kent and Medway timeline to re-procure their Community Services, and specifically jointly commission an Integrated Therapy Contract for 1 September 2025.

 

The current annual contract values are £752,905 with East Kent Hospital University Foundation Trust (EKHUFT) and £1,526,586 with Kent Community Health Foundation Trust (KCHFT).

 

This requires agreeing a retrospective contract for the financial year 2023/2024 and a future contract for 17 months from1 April 2024 to 31 August 2025.

 

Decision is also sought to review and bring the Kent and Medway Communication and Assistive Technology service into the new jointly commissioned Integrated Therapy Contract, under the NHS Kent and Medway Community Services re-procurement. 

 

Background

 

The 2015 Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Code of Practice, sets out that Speech and Language Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy and Assistive Technology should be jointly commissioned.

 

KCC is working towards a jointly commissioned Integrated Therapy Service, which will include the Kent and Medway Communication and Assistive Technology Service (KMCAT), to maximise the use of finite resources from local authorities, schools, colleges and the NHS improving outcomes for 0–25-year-olds with SEND and their parents/carers.

 

The joint aim is to establish a new jointly commissioned service by September 2025, to fall in line with NHS Kent and Medway’s broader recommissioning of a unified Community Service Offer.

 

Significant transformational activity is underway with the NHS providers who are working in partnership with KCC and NHS Kent and Meway to develop new ways of working.   Implementing a more proactive and preventative tiered approach to the provision of therapy support, that will maximise use of finite resources and ensure a more coherent county-wide offer.

 

Securing Kent’s Future – Budget Recovery Strategy

 

KCC has agreed with the Providers that there will be no increase to the contract price for 2023/2024, however, the Providers have stated that this position will not be sustainable for 2024/2025, and therefore negotiations continue. 

The contract values for 2024/2025 will be agreed alongside Finance colleagues and the Director for Education.

The longer-term joint commissioning project will meet the ambitions of Framing Kent’s Future as follows:

 

Priority 4: New models of care and support demand for our social care services has out stripped funding year on year. Our commitment is to seize the opportunity of integrating our planning, commissioning and decision making in adult, children’s and public health services through being a partner in the Kent and Medway Integrated Care System at place and system level.

 

It meets the aims of Securing Kent’s Future by holding Best Value at the centre of all joint commissioning opportunities.

 

Financial Implications

These contracts are for the provision of Therapy staff and are only a proportion of the overall Therapy services purchased by the Council. A high-level reconciliation has been undertaken to be able to justify the level of spend in commensurate with the level of service provided, given that vacancies have been held to compensate for the lack of inflationary uplift. 

KCC has been in negotiation with the Providers for this year’s fee increase and have agreed in 2023/2024 there will be no fee increase, this has meant the providers have held frozen vacancies.

Both Providers have stated that continuing without a fee increase into the new financial year 2024/2025 will not be sustainable, and therefore negotiations continue. 

The current contract values are £725,905 for EKHUFT and £1,526,586 for KCHFT, contract values for 2024/2025 will be agreed alongside Finance colleagues and the Director for Education.

This contract is funded from the Dedicated Schools Grant: High Needs Block, an annual grant provided by the Department of Education.

 

 

Legal Implications  

 

The procurement strategy is to align existing Therapy services required by KCC, with the service commissioned by the NHS Kent and Medway and to jointly commission the service, with the NHS Kent and Medway as the Lead Commissioner and KCC as a Joint Commissioner. 

 

As a Joint Commissioner, it is expected that KCC will be a full partner of the contract with the provider(s) and will have the ability to participate in performance contract management and monitoring, with NHS Kent and Medway.  This will strengthen existing contract performance monitoring and management, given the scale and value of the proposed contract.

 

The Provider Selection Regime (PRS) came in to force on 1 January 2024. PSR is a set of rules for procuring health care services, by NHS England, Integrated Care Board, NHS Trusts, NHS Foundation Trusts and Local Authorities.

 

There are three Provider Selection processes:

  • Direct Award processes (A, B, and C). These involve awarding contracts to providers when there is limited or no reason to seek to change from the existing provider; or to assess providers against one another, because:
    • the existing provider is the only provider that can deliver the health care services (direct award process A)
    • patients have a choice of providers and the number of providers is not restricted by the relevant authority (direct award process B)
    • the existing provider is satisfying its existing contract, will likely satisfy the new contract to a sufficient standard, and the proposed contracting arrangements are not changing considerably (direct award process C).
  • Most Suitable Provider
  • Competitive Process

 

For the 2023/2024 contract, the Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015 would have applied, however as PSR is now in force, this is the regulation that covers the provision of Therapy services, and it is therefore recommended that the route followed to sign these contracts is under Direct Award (C).

 

For any other meaningful commissioning using this Regime would require developing specifications, detailed outcome frameworks and key performance indicators, quality assurance mechanisms and contract management schedule.  This would also not allow for the necessary coproduction with Children, Young People, and their Families/Carers, as required by the SEND Code of Practice and our commitment to the SEND Co-production Charter.

 

Equalities implications

 

A full Equalities Impact Assessment (EqIA) will be completed as part of the Joint Commissioning Strategy, to help us to consider the potential impact of a proposal, and how to make things as fair as possible for anyone who is likely to be affected. The level of detail required for an EqIA depends on how complex the proposal is, and to what extent people are likely to be affected by it.  We believe this will have far reaching implications and therefore full EqIA will be required.

DPIA (if relevant)

A DPIA checklist will be completed in due course as part of the commissioning plan to ensure KCC and partners ability identify and minimise the data protection risks within this commissioned activity. As this is a major project which requires the processing of personal data, the DPIA Assessment will therefore:

  • describe the nature, scope, context and purposes of the processing;
  • assess necessity, proportionality and compliance measures;
  • identify and assess risks to individuals; and
  • identify any additional measures to mitigate those risks.

 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Education and Skills

Decision due date: Not before 02/04/2024 To allow 28 day notice period required under Exeuctive Decision regulations

Lead officer: Christy Holden

Notice of decision: 04/03/2024

Anticipated restriction: Open


13/03/2023 - 23/00030 - Implementation of an independent Construction Consultancy Services Framework to support the implementation and delivery of the Capital Works Programmes

Proposed decision:

The Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Finance, Corporate and Traded Services to agree to the implementation of a new Independent Consultancy Services Framework to support the delivery of the Capital Works Programmes over a 6-year (4-year+1+1) contract period to include the following disciplines:

              Lot 1 – Multi-discipline (client delegated duties)

              Lot 2 – Project Manager (including client delegated Quantity Surveying duties)

              Lot 3 – Supervisor

              Lot 4 – Technical Advisor

              Lot 5 – Construction Design and Management Advisor

 

Reason for the decision

The Kent County Council had previously appointed consultants on a project-by-project basis via the Property Services Consultancy Framework, to provide professional consultancy services to support construction projects. However, the Framework expired in June 2020 and procurement of such services has since been conducted on a project-by-project basis, tendered or direct award procurements in-line with Spending the Council’s Money Policy and Public Contract Regulations.

 

The current method of procuring consultancy services is time consuming and resource intensive and requires a more efficient approach. In addition, a new professional consultancy services framework that aligns to the new construction partnership framework (already in place) and proposed minor work construction partnership framework (subject to procurement).

 

Options

There are 3 options to consider for the ongoing procurement of consultancy services:

              Insource of consultancy provision.

              Continuing with current arrangement of tendering/direct award for each requirement

              Establishing a new Construction Consultancy Framework.

 

Option 3, to establishing a new Construction Consultancy Framework is the preferred option, as this would provide a pre-qualified framework of consultants to efficiently support the projects procured via the new Construction and proposed Minor Works Partnership Frameworks on behalf of Kent County Council. It is likely that the Frameworks will work on a rotational basis so that all suppliers get equal allocation of works (performance and project dependant).  In addition to this the facility to undertake mini tenders will be included.

 

It is envisaged that the new Independent Construction Consultancy Services Frameworks will commence by October 2023.

 

How the proposed decision supports the Interim Strategic Plan

The proposed decision will support the objectives of Strategic Delivery Plan 2020 – 2023 by:

              Supporting the delivery of the Council’s Infrastructure Capital Delivery Programme

              Supporting the delivery of the Kent Commissioning Plan for Education Provision 2020-2024, including the Basic Need programme

              Supporting the KCC Corporate Estate maintenance programme.

              Supporting the KCC Education Estate maintenance programme.

Decision Maker: Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Finance, Corporate and Traded Services

Decision due date: Not before 11/04/2023

Lead officer: James Sanderson

Notice of decision: 13/03/2023

Anticipated restriction: Part exempt  - view reasons


09/09/2021 - 21/00076 - Provision of Community Support Services for Disabled Children and Young People - Outcome of Procurement Process

Proposed decision –

 

Contracts to be awarded to successful providers for the provision of Community Support Services (Care and Support in the Home) for Disabled Children and Young People following a recent procurement exercise linked to the Adults Care and Support in the Home contract.

 

Delegate decisions on the implementation to the Corporate Director of Children, Young People and Education, or other Officer, in consultation with the Corporate Director of Adult Social Care and Health as appropriate.

 

Further information –

 

Decision 20/00102 - Community Support Services for Disabled Children & Young People was taken on 19 March 2020 and allowed officers to follow a competitive procurement process for children’s community support services within the Adults ‘Care and Support in the Home’ contract. 

 

Following the competitive procurement process a further decision is required to award the contracts to the successful providers. 

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Integrated Children's Services

Decision due date: Not before 08/10/2021

Division affected: (All Division);

Lead officer: Christy Holden

Notice of decision: 09/09/2021

Anticipated restriction: Open


20/09/2017 - 17/00094 - Disposal of Land East of Great Chart Primary School, Singleton

Approval to the Director of Infrastructure to progress with and enter into the necessary documentation to complete the disposal of the aforementioned property in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Corporate and Democratic Services. The Decision will seek legal agreements to be actioned to complete the sale of the relevant properties.

Decision Maker: Cabinet Member for Corporate and Democratic Services

Decision due date: Not before 18/10/2017 In order that the proposed decision can be published for a minimum of 28 days, in accordance with statutory requirements

Lead officer: Roderick Lemerle

Notice of decision: 20/09/2017

Anticipated restriction: Part exempt  - view reasons